Tag Archives: leadership

Three Leadership Lessons from Satya Nadella

As another year picks up steam, I’m once again reminded that “time flies like an arrow”.  For instance, though it feels like it was yesterday, in February 2015 it’ll be a year since Satya Nadella became Microsoft’s new CEO.  Tasked with implementing sweeping changes at the technology behemoth, some of his moves have been expected and applauded, while others have been surprising and controversial.  Most of us don’t run a large company for a living, but I think there are three very basic steps that can be inferred from Nadella’s style that are worth keeping fresh in our own jobs.

Continue reading

Defuse Micromanagement by Emphasizing Time Instead of Control

If you enjoy working with micro-managers, you can skip the rest of this post.

OK.  Now that I have your attention, let me offer a suggestion for dealing with the micro-managers in your environment by approaching them with a genuine intention to help with –not correct– this trait.  Help them deal with the impact it has on their time, as opposed of making it about the way they control their duties.

Continue reading

Risk and Reward: Type Consistency Matters

Traffic was rather heavy as I was driving home from work today.  At some point, I noticed the lane to my right was clear, whereas a few feet ahead my lane was jammed.  I started changing lanes, but then the car ahead of me (which was fully stopped) attempted to do the same.  As I had more room, I stepped a bit firmer on the gas, hoping the other car noticed and let me pass to its right.  It worked.

As I pulled away from the jam, I pondered my rather trivial feat.  Unconsciously, I had performed a flawed risk/reward analysis: for the perceived benefit of pulling into my driveway a few seconds earlier, I had risked entering a car crash — even a fender bender is annoying enough as to deny any real or perceived time benefits.

Obvious, right?  Yet we do it all the time with much more critical things.  I’m not talking about flawed probability percentages or delusional rewards — though those are serious problems in their own right; I’m talking about risks and rewards that are not really exchangeable in terms of units or dimensions.  Thus, for the prospect of a won argument, we risk a long-term relationship.  For the reward of making it to production a couple days earlier, we risk data integrity, customer satisfaction and architectural quality.  For the sake of familiarity and transferred responsibility, we enter unacceptable risk as we plan and execute projects using known-flawed waterfall methodologies, with vendors that should know better.

There doesn’t seem to be much written about this, and it makes a lot of sense: risk-reward analysis originates in the financial industry, where the one ruthless unit for all measures is money.  We are supposed to do that as well (make a business case or somehow else monetize much of our IT project decisions), but all too often we lack method, discipline, or both — and yet we plow ahead based on questionable proxies for actual business risk and value.

Next time I carry out a risk-reward analysis, I’ll try to make sure that both ends are measured in the same units.  I hope you do too!

What Color Are Your Staff Meetings?

Over the years, I’ve had the privilege of being part of a few teams: development teams, architecture teams, management teams.  I’ve also been privileged to manage a few teams of my own.  In my experience, I’ve seen that staff meetings tend to fall within two distinct styles or “colors”, and of course there’s room for many intermediate shades as well.  In this post, I outline the styles and make the case for my favorite meeting color.

Continue reading

Bridging Two Fallacies

As an IT leader, I often find myself walking a thin line: I am the company’s voice before the employees, and the employees’ voice before the company.  This extends to mediating between internal parties and vendors, auditors, consultants and other external entities as well.  While not an absolute situation (and certainly not at my current workplace), it is often the case that higher leadership pushes an IT management model that is ultimately a fallacy.  Curiously enough, other parties’ retort is also deeply flawed.  Both are rooted in good intentions, but tangle up in a vicious circle that does more harm than good, even though no one overtly intends it.  In a sense, a lot of IT leadership and management efforts are spent bridging these two fallacies. Continue reading